Ancient

Books on Ancient Indian Coins


Felicitas : Essays in Numismatics Epigraphy and History in Honour of Joe Cribb Edited by Shailendra Bhandare and Sanjay Gargin Honour of Joe Cribb
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Felicitas : Essays in Numismatics Epigraphy and History in Honour of Joe Cribb Edited by Shailendra Bhandare and Sanjay Gargin Honour of Joe Cribb

Rs 2,200.00

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Contents: 1. Coinage, Prestige and Identity: From Rome to Persepolis and China/Michael Alram. 2. Linking the Past: Overstruck Coins and the Chronology of the Satavahanas/Shailendra Bhandare. 3. Kankali Tila and Kushan Chronology/Robert Bracey. 4. Fascination with the Past: Ancient Persia on the Coins and Banknotes of Iran/Vesta Sarkhosh Curtis.1 5. Reinterpretation of a Samatata Coin - The First Numismatic Depiction of Bodhisattva/Manjushri John S. Deyell. 6. A hoard of punch-marked coins from Mathura(?)/ Elizabeth Errington. 7. Ten thoughts on the Mathura Lion capital reliquary/Harry Falk. 8. Looking For Tyche: On the Tracks of a Syncretism from Greece to Gandhara/Christine Frohlich. 9. The Raj and the Rajas: a Tale of Numismatic Diplomacy/Sanjay Garg. 10. Minting Technology in Mughal India/Najaf Haider. 11. Aspects of Human Society from the earliest Punch-marked Coinages of the Indian Subcontinent/Terry Hardaker. 12. Coins and Commerce in Bihar in Seventeenth Century: Some Reflections/Syed Ejaz Hussain. 13. A Review of the Pagoda Coins of South East India during the Nayaka and Early Colonial Period/Barbara Mears. 14. Harasri: A New King of Ancient Almora/Wilfried Pieper. 15. Coins as History: Kuninda and Kota coins of Punjab/Himanshu Prabha Ray. 16. The Coinage of Samudra Pasai/Nicholas Rhodes and Vasilijs Mihailovs. 17. History of the Coin Collection of the Bengal Sultans in the British Museum/Sutapa Sinha. 19. The Crowns of Kanishka's Bronze Coins and Some Additional Shiva Images on Kushan Coins/Pankaj Tandon. 20. Onomastic, Title and Chronology of the Turgesh Kaghans/Francois Thierry. 21. Famous and Not-so-famous People Associated with the Royal Asiatic Society /Helen Wang. Contributors.

Joe Cribb, whom Felicitas seeks to honour, needs no introduction to any enthusiast of coins and paper money of Asia, specially of the Indian subcontinent. As a curator of South Asians Coins in the Department of Coins and Medals in the British Museum, and lately the Keeper of this department, Joe has had a ‘hand’ in a variety of numismatic activities.” Starting with Chinese coins, Joe moved to many other themes and subjects within the broader range of ‘Oriental’ numismatics and history, making invaluable contributions to highly controversial subject areas, like the inception of coinage in the Indian subcontinent and the chronological questions facing complex coinages in Central Asia. Significantly, Joe Cribb’s academic interests not just centre around the broad theme of ‘Money’, which encompasses numismatics, but also go much beyond.

Covering a vast time and space, the essays here deal with the most ancient of the sub-continental coinages as well as those that deal with the most modern and conventional forms of money, like banknotes. Among other specificities, the essays explore socio-historical themes associated with coinage, study iconography through coins, examine royal as well as religious coins icons seen on Kushan coins, offer fresh interpretation of the ‘Lion Pillar’ inscription from Mathura, and highlight the role/utility of coins in historical reconstruction from a conceptual perspective, analyzing the deployment of coins to underline archaeological and historical periods. Several other themes examined here include minting technology in Mughal India, pagoda coins of South East India, Kuninda and Kota coins of the Punjab, or how coins were used as a tool of diplomacy in the colonial India.

Shailendra Bhandare works as Assistant Keeper at the Heberden Coin Room, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. He is also a member of faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford. Dr Sanjay Garg is the editor of Numismatic Digest the research journal of the Indian Institute of Research in Numismatic Studies.


A Macro Study Of Early Indian Coins by C. Mani
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A Macro Study Of Early Indian Coins by C. Mani

Rs 800.00

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 "Study of coins mani coins why we study about coins coins of mani coins mani how to study indian coins view all the indian coins study about indian coins early indian coins study on indian coins."


Chats on Old Coins by Fred W. Burgess
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Chats on Old Coins by Fred W. Burgess

Rs 1,045.00

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Contents: Preface. 1. The collector's aim. 2. The story of coinage. 3. Coins of ancient Greece. 4. Coins of ancient Rome and the republican era. 5. The coins of the twelve great caesars. 6. Roman currency under the later emperors. 7. Early British and Romano-British. 8. The saxon period. 9. Norman and plantagenet. 10. Coins of the lancastrian and 'Yorkist Kings. 11. The tudor period. 12. The stuarts. 13. The commonwealth, and after the restoration. 14. The house of hanover. 15. Victoria, Edward VII, and George V. 16. Regal copper coins. 17. British colonial currency. 18. Ireland and the Isle of man. 19. Coins of Scotland. 20. American coinage. 21. Seventeenth-century tokens. 22. Eighteenth-century tokens. 23. Nineteenth-century tokens. Bibliography. Index.

From the Preface: 'Numismatic literature has hitherto been prepared for the specialist, and adapted to those who wish to posses in categorical form a complete--or as nearly so as the writer's knowledge enabled him, to make it--list of the coins and medals of the period under review. Some books have been written for the beginner and those who at small cost were desirous of obtaining an elementary account of the particular branch of coin collecting in which they were interested. Few attempts, however, have been made to provide in condensed form a book dealing with the obsolete currencies which have, throughout the world's history, been used by its most prominent nations.

In this little work the author has endeavoured to "skim the cream" off the heavier and, to some, drier problems of numismatology, and to present in acceptable "popular" form the more interesting facts which should be known to every collector.

Among the branches of study touched upon are those associated with the coins of the ancients most prominent in European history. The beauties of Greek coins and Roman medallions are strongly in evidence. The dawn of civilization as seen in the early currency of Britain is pointed out, and step by step the story of the coinage of Great Britain and her dependencies--the Greater Britain beyond the Seas--is unfolded.

Recognizing not only that the blood-relationship of the freeborn sons of American soil makes the coinage of the old world which their forefathers handled interesting to them, but that the coins used by dwellers in the United States and in Canada are valued by English collectors, I have given prominence to American currencies.

The British regal coinage has so frequently been supplemented by token issues, which have for a time become a part of the national currency, that I have included in "Chats on Old Coins" a few chapters on tokens."


Coin Splendour : A Journey into the Past by Prasanna Rao Bandela
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Coin Splendour : A Journey into the Past by Prasanna Rao Bandela

Rs 1,200.00

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Contents: Preface. Introduction. 1. Mauryan legacy. 2. Coming of the Yavanas. 3. The Kushanas. 4. The Sathavahanas. 5. The Western Ksatrapas. 6. The Golden Age of the Guptas. 7. Pallava heritage. 8. Glorious Vijayanagara. 9. The Golden South. 10. Those magnificent medals. 11. History in metal. 12. A pastime gaining currency. 13. Fascinating rarities. Index.

"Coins are indeed the most enduring pieces of frozen time. These time-capsules transport us instantly into our past. They conjure up before us the lives and times of our ancestors.

They provide the most authoritative record of history. As pieces of evidence they are invaluable because they may add a new fact, or a name, or a date to history.

The rise and fall of great early civilizations of Rome and Greece are well chronicled and illustrated on their coins. In India, for example, the coins of the Guptas reveal the grandeur of their golden age. Coins tell us about the empires of the kings who minted them and the people who used them as money. They witness the flowering and decay of artistic expression of their times. Many traces of human development can also be seen on them.

This small volume is an attempt to show what coins can teach us as documents of history, monuments of art and artifacts of our national heritage. Coins of prominent ancient Indian kingdoms upto 15 century AD are described. Two chapters are devoted to medals of historical importance. Some examples of fascinating coin-rarities are given in the last two chapters.


Tribal Coins of Ancient India
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Tribal Coins of Ancient India

Rs 2,900.00

About the Book

Contents: Preface. Acknowledgements. Introduction. 1. The Agras. 2. The Arjunayanas. 3. The Audumbaras. 4. The Kulutas. 5. The Kshudrakas. 6. The Kunindas. 7. The Malavas. 8. The Pauravas. 9. The Rajanyas. 10. The Savitriputras. 11. The Sibis. 12. The Trigartas. 13. The Uddehikas. 14. The Vemakis / Vaiyamakas. 15. The Vrishnis. 16. The Yaudheyas. Appendices. Bibliography. Index.

"Tribal coins throw a flood of light on the history, culture, religion, economy, polity, trade, commerce, technology, symbology, metrology, movements, etc. of the various tribes in ancient India. They thus enlighten us about various aspects of the life and culture of the people in ancient India.

Numismatic discoveries made from time to time, interpretations and newer techniques of analysis have rendered earlier views in many cases as obsolete and worth revision. Some new types of Agreya coins published recently throw fresh light on the religions proclivities of the Agras. Coins discovered from Nohar show the presence of the Arjunayana Tribe in Northeastern Rajasthan. A critical analysis of the typology and provenance of Audumbara coins reveals that the monarchical issues of the Mitra rulers do not actually belong to the tribe, and that there was no ruler of the name of Mahadeva belonging to the Audumbara stock, thus rendering the old classification of their coins as outdated. The discovery of the hoards at Chakkar near Mandi and at Hat Koti and Jalog in Shimla District in Himachal Pradesh, stray finds of new types of Kuninda coins, their coin molds from regular excavations at Sanghol in Punjab and their coins from the site of the Syena-Chiti (Eagle-shaped fire-altar) at Purola in Uttaranchal have thrown fresh light on their history, culture, religion, kingship, capital, mint-site and techniques of minting, trade and commerce, etc. The diminutive nature of Malava coins as evidence of poor economy stands challenged in the light of epigraphic evidence. The existence of the Kshudrakas and Savitriputras has been proved on the basis of their coins. The Vemakis were known only from Rudravarman's silver and a dubious copper coin but the author has brought two of their new rulers -- Bhavavarman and Sivaghosha - to light. The settlement of the Vrishnis at Sunet near Ludhiana is proved by a number of their seals, sealings and copper coins. Many fallacies about the Yaudheyas have also been corrected by a fresh study and analysis of their coins.

This book, based on a study of various published and unpublished hoards and stray finds of coins in institutional and private collections is the first Indian publication on the tribal coins containing the largest number of illustrations bringing to light many new coins and offering new interpretations.


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